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Corry DD- 817 - History

Corry DD- 817 - History


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Corry III

(DD-817: dp. 2,425; 1. 390'6"; b. 41'1", dr. 18'6"; s. 35 k.; cpl. 367; a. 6 5", 10 21" tt., 6 dcp., 2 dct.; cl. Gearing)

The third Corry (DD-817) was launched 28 July 1945 by Consolidated Steel Corp. of Texas, Orange, Tex.sponsored by Miss Corry, commissioned 27 February 1946, Commander M. S. Shellabarger in command; and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

Corry sailed from Galveston, Tex., 28 March 1946 for shakedown training in the Caribbean, and arrived at Norfolk 10 July. Following a tour of duty in European and Mediterranean waters from 23 July 1946 to 19 March 1947, Corry conducted Reserve training cruises from the Potomac River Naval Command, then reported to Pensacola to serve as plane guard for carriers operating off Florida from 22 September 1947 to 28 April 1950.

Corry joined Destroyer Squadron 8 at Norfolk 22 May 1950 for antisubmarine exercisers which included a cruise to Quebec in July. From 2 September to 12 November she served with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, and joined a midshipman cruise to northern Europe, visiting Gotesburg and Cherbourg, France, from 1 June to 27 July 1951. Her next tour of duty with the 6th Fleet was from 22 April to 23 October 1952. Corry sailed out of Norfolk for local operations until 1 April 1953 when she was decommissioned for conversion to a radar picket destroyer. She was reclassified DDR-817 9 April 1953.

Recommissioned 9 January 1954, Corry carried NROTC midshipmen on a cruise to New Orleans and through the Panama Canal for operations at Balboa in the summer of 1954. From September 1954 through 1960 Corry alternated four tours of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean with operations out of Norfolk along the east coast, and exercises in the Caribbean.


USS Corry (DD-817)

USS Corry (DD/DDR-817) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, the third Navy ship named for Lieutenant Commander William M. Corry, Jr. (1889�), a naval aviator who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

The Gearing class was a series of 98 destroyers built for the U.S. Navy during and shortly after World War II. The Gearing design was a minor modification of the Allen M. Sumner class , whereby the hull was lengthened by 14 ft (4.3 m) at amidships, which resulted in more fuel storage space and increased the operating range.

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, maneuverable long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy or battle group and defend them against smaller powerful short-range attackers. They were originally developed in the late 19th century by Fernando Villaamil for the Spanish Navy as a defense against torpedo boats, and by the time of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904, these "torpedo boat destroyers" (TBDs) were "large, swift, and powerfully armed torpedo boats designed to destroy other torpedo boats". Although the term "destroyer" had been used interchangeably with "TBD" and "torpedo boat destroyer" by navies since 1892, the term "torpedo boat destroyer" had been generally shortened to simply "destroyer" by nearly all navies by the First World War.

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the Navy is the third largest of the service branches. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March�, making it the second largest and second most powerful air force in the world.


3 October 1920

Ensign William Merrill Corry, Jr., United States Navy, March 1913. (F. Brunel/United States Navy Bureau of Personnel)

Lieutenant Commander William Merrill Corry, Jr., United States Navy, was assigned as aviation aide to Admiral William Braid Wilson, Jr., Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet, aboard the battleship USS Pennsylvania (BB-38). On Saturday, 2 October 1920, Lieutenant Commander Corry, in company with Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Arthur C. Wagner, Reserve Force, United States Navy, flew from Mitchel Field, Mineola, Long Island, New York, to Hartford, Connecticut. Their airplane was a two-place, single-engine Curtiss JN-4 biplane. The flight was intended as a cross-country flight for the two pilots to maintain proficiency.

On arrival at Hartford, because there was no airfield in the vicinity, the pair landed on the grounds of the Hartford Golf Club. They stayed over the weekend as guests of Colonel Hamilton R. Horsey, formerly chief-of-staff of the 26th Division, U.S. Army, during the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives of World War I, and Lieutenant Colonel James S. Howard.

At about 3:00 p.m., on Sunday, 3 October, Corry and Wagner were ready to return to Mineola. Lieutenant (j.g.) Wagner was flying from the forward cockpit, while Lieutenant Commander Corry was in the rear cockpit.

The Curtiss took off toward the north and at about 50 feet (15 meters) altitude, turned toward the southwest. As the airplane passed over the golf course club house, Corry waved to Colonel Horsey. The airplane approached a large grove of trees, then turned right, back to the north. The engine stopped and the airplane nose-dived into the ground from about 75 feet (23 meters).

The Hartford Courant reported:

Burned wreckage of the Curtiss JN-4 biplane flown by Wagner and Corry, 2–3 October 1920. (The Hartford Courant)

The machine hit the ground at a sharp angle and immediately turned over endwise, the propeller catching in the ground. Commander Corry was catapulted from his seat, but Wagner, who had strapped himself into his seat, was less fortunate. As the machine turned over it burst into flames, enveloping him in a wash of blazing gasoline from the broken tank.

Corry’s Bravery.

Commander Corry, picking himself up from the ground, was the first to rush to the aid of his comrade. It was in this way that his coat caught fire with the resulting burns to his hands and face. He was unable to pull Wagner free and it was not until Walter E. Patterson of the Travelers Insurance Company, and Martin Keane, an attache of the club, added their efforts this was successfully accomplished. Club members rushed from the clubhouse with several gallons of olive and sweet oil and were on hand almost as soon as the stricken man was freed from his seat. While the burning clothing was being removed from Wagner’s body, Benjamin Allen, a porter in the club, quickly wrapped his coat around Corry’s head and thus cut off any chance of the flames reaching the officer’s nose or eyes.

Allen then, with Corry helping, removed the coat and smothered the other smouldering pieces of clothing. Corry’s hands and face were so badly burned that not a trace of skin was left untouched. Several ribs were also broken.

Wagner Game.

Wagner was rolled over on the ground by willing hands to extinguish the flames and with the help of the two men who had dragged him from his place beneath the plane, such of his clothing as still remained unburned was stripped from his body to make way for dressings in olive and sweet oil, which by this time were available. He was wrapped in swaths of oil soaked linen and cotton sheeting to allay the agony of his burns. Every scrap of clothing was almost entirely consumed and his shoes were burned to a crisp. Throughout the process, Wagner, fully conscious, was directing the efforts of the willing helpers, despite the fact that his face was beyond recognition, with nose and ears burned from his head.

He remained game even to the time when he was being tenderly lifted to the ambulance, when he thanked those who had helped telling them that he was sure they had done all they could. . .

. . . In spite of a heroic fight for life, covering nearly eight hours from the time he received his burns, Wagner died soon after 10 o’clock. The tremendous display of pluck and vitality shown by the man through all of his agony was the marvel of all the physicians and nurses in the hospital. . . .

The Hartford Courant, Monday Morning, 4 October 1920, Page 1, Column 8, and Page 2, Column 1.

Four days later, 7 October 1920,¹ Lieutenant Commander Corry also died of his injuries. He was just 31 years old.

For his bravery in attempting to rescue Lieutenant (j.g.) Wagner, Lieutenant Commander William Merrill Corry, Jr., United States Navy, was awarded the Medal of Honor. His citation reads:

“For heroic service in attempting to rescue a brother officer from a flame -enveloped airplane. On 2 October 1920,² an airplane in which Lt. Comdr. Corry was a passenger crashed and burst into flames. He was thrown 30 feet clear of the plane and, though injured, rushed back to the burning machine and endeavored to release the pilot. In so doing he sustained serious burns, from which he died 4 days later.”

Medal of Honor, United States Navy and Marine Corps, 1919–1942.

William Merrill Corry, Jr., was born 5 October 1889 at Quincy, Florida. He was the second of six children of William Merrill Corry, a tobacco dealer, and Sarah Emily Wiggins Corry.

Midshipman William Merrill Corry, Jr., U.S. Naval Academy, 1910.

“Bill” Corry was admitted to the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, as a midshipman, 20 June 1906. He was a classmate of future Admiral Marc A. Mitscher. On 7 July 1910, Midshipman Corry was assigned to the 16,000 ton Connecticut-class battleship USS Kansas (BB-21). He was commissioned an Ensign, United States Navy, 7 March 1912.

Ensign Corry was promoted to Lieutenant (junior grade), 7 March 1915. He was assigned to the naval aeronautic station (Y-13) at Pensacola, Florida, 7 July 1915. On completion of flight training, Lieutenant (j.g.) Corry was designated Naval Aviator No. 23, 16 March 1916.

26 November 1916, Lieutenant (j.g.) Correy was assigned to the Tennessee-class armored cruiser USS Seattle (ACR-11). In 1917 he was assigned to USS North Carolina (ACR-12).

The United States entered World War I on 6 April 1917. On 22 August 1917, Lieutenant (j.g.) Corry was sent to France for for duty with the U.S. Naval Aviation Forces in Europe. Corry was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant, 7 March 1918. He was placed in command of the aviation school at Le Croisic, on the western coast of France, 7 November 1917. While there he was awarded the Navy Cross, “for distinguished and heroic service as an Airplane Pilot making many daring flights over the enemy’s lines, also for untiring and efficient efforts toward the organization of U.S. Naval Aviation, Foreign Service, and the building up of the Northern Bombing project.” (The Northern Bombing Group targeted bases supporting German submarine operations.) France appointed him a Chevalier de la légion d’honneur.

Lieutenant Corry took command of the Naval Air Station at Brest, France, 7 June 1918. He was promoted to the temporary rank of Lieutenant Commander, 1 July 1918. He remained at Brest until the Armistice, 11 November 1918. He was involved in the demobilization of U.S. forces in France and Belgium. He also served in various staff assignments.

Lieutenant Commander Corry was ordered to return to the United States as aide for aviation to the Chief-of-Staff Atlantic Fleet. He sailed from Antwerp, Belgium on 2 June 1920, aboard SS Finland, bound for New York.

Lieutenant Commander William Merrill Corry, Jr., Medal of Honor, Navy Cross, Chevalier de la légion d’honneur, is buried at the Eastern Cemetery, Quincy, Florida.

Following his death, the United States Navy named an auxiliary landing field at Pensacola. Florida, Corry Field, in his honor. A nearby airfield assumed the name in 1928, and is presently called NAS Pensacola Corry Station.

Three United States Navy warships have also been named USS Corry. On 25 May 1921, a Clemson-class “flush-deck” or “four-stack” destroyer, USS Corry (DD-334), was commissioned. It was decommissioned in 1930.

USS Corry (DD-334), early 1920s. (Pier Studio, San Diego)

The Gleaves-class destroyer USS Corry (DD-463) was launched 28 July 1941, christened by Miss Jean Constance Corry, with Miss Sara Corry as Maid of Honor. The new destroyer was commissioned 18 December 1941. Corry is notable for its participation in anti-submarine operations in the Atlantic, sinking U-801 on 17 March 1944. Corry rescued 47 sailors from that submarine, and another 8 from U-1059, which was sunk two days later.

Corry was herself sunk by during an artillery duel with a German coastal battery off Utah Beach, Normandy, 6 June 1944. Of the destroyer’s crew of 276 men, 24 were killed and 60 were wounded. Broken in half, the ship sank in shallow water. The American Flag at her masthead remained visible above the water as the ship settled on the sea bed.

USS Corry (DD-463) prepares to rescue survivors of U-801, 17 March 1944. (U.S. Navy)

The Gearing-class destroyer USS Corry (DD-817) was commissioned 27 February 1946 at Orange, Texas. The ship’s sponsor was Miss Gertrude Corry, niece of Lieutenant Commander Corry. Corry served the U.S. Navy until decommissioned 27 February 1981 after 35 years of service. It was turned over to Greece and renamed HS Kriezis (D-217). The ship was finally retired in 1994, and scrapped in 2002.

USS Corry (DD-817), a Gearing-class destroyer, alongside USS Baltimore (CA-68), Mediterranean Sea, 1952. (QM2 George Panos, United States Navy)

Lieutenant (junior grade) Arthur C. Wagner, Reserve Force, United States Navy, was born 18 August 1988. He was the son of William Wagner and Elizabeth Genting (?) Wagner.

At the time of his death, Lieutenant Wagner was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet Ship Plane Division, Mitchel Field, Mineola, Long Island, New York. He had previously served aboard USS Nevada (BB-36). In 1919 he trained as a pilot at Naval Air Station Pensacola, and was then assigned to USS Shawmut (CM-4), a minelayer which had been reclassified as an airplane tender.

Lieutenant (j.g.) Arthur C. Wagner was buried at the Old Cathedral Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 8 October 1920.

¹ While many sources give the date of Corry’s death as 6 October 1920, probate documents filed with the County of Gadsen court on 5 November 1920, and signed by Corry’s mother, Sarah E. Corry, give the date as 7 October 1920. Further, The Hartford Courant, in its Thursday, 7 October 1920 edition, at Page 1, Column 2 and 3, reported: “Lieutenant Commander William M. Corry, in charge of the Curtiss naval airplane which crashed to earth at Hartford Golf Club last Sunday afternoon, died at the Hartford Hospital at 2:30 o’clock this morning of burns. . . .”


CORRY DD 817

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Gearing Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid April 5 1945 - Launched July 28 1945

Struck from Naval Register February 27 1981

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Contents

Corry sailed from Galveston, Texas, on 28 March 1946 for shakedown training in the Caribbean, and arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, on 10 July. Following a tour of duty in European and Mediterranean waters from 23 July 1946 to 19 March 1947, Corry conducted Reserve training cruises from the Potomac River Naval Command, then reported to Pensacola, Florida, to serve as plane guard for aircraft carriers operating off Florida from 22 September 1947 to 28 April 1950.

Corry joined Destroyer Squadron 8 (DesRon 8) at Norfolk 22 May 1950 for antisubmarine exercises which included a cruise to Quebec in July. From 2 September to 12 November she served with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, and joined a midshipman cruise to northern Europe, visiting Gotesburg and Cherbourg, France, from 1 June to 27 July 1951. Her next tour of duty with the 6th Fleet was from 22 April to 23 October 1952. Corry sailed out of Norfolk for local operations until 1 April 1953 when she was decommissioned for conversion to a radar picket destroyer. She was reclassified DDR-817, 9 April 1953.

Recommissioned 9 January 1954, Corry carried NROTC midshipmen on a cruise to New Orleans, Louisiana, and through the Panama Canal for operations at Balboa in the summer of 1954. From September 1954 through 1960 Corry alternated four tours of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean with operations out of Norfolk along the east coast, and exercises in the Caribbean.

Corry reverted to DD-817 on 1 January 1964.

West PAC cruise Sept 68 to Apr 69 in support of US forces in Vietnam. Sailed 49,125 nautical miles round trip out of Norfolk, Virginia, fired 6,607 5"38 cal rounds, destroyed 72 structures and bunkers with 15 known enemy KIAs.

Corry was decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 27 February 1981.


USS Corry (DD-817), Destroyer, HS Kriezis (D-217)

USS Corry (DD/DDR-817) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, the third Navy ship named for Lieutenant Commander William M. Corry, Jr. (1889–1920), a naval aviator who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Corry was launched on 28 July 1945 by Consolidated Steel Corp. of Texas, Orange, Texas sponsored by Miss Corry commissioned on 27 February 1946, Commander M. S. Shellabarger in command and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

Corry sailed from Galveston, Texas, on 28 March 1946 for shakedown training in the Caribbean Sea, and arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, on 10 July. Following a tour of duty in European waters and the Mediterranean Sea from 23 July 1946 to 19 March 1947, Corry conducted Reserve training cruises from the Potomac River Naval Command, then reported to Pensacola, Florida, to serve as plane guard for aircraft carriers operating off Florida from 22 September 1947 to 28 April 1950.

Corry joined Destroyer Squadron 8 (DesRon 8) at Norfolk 22 May 1950 for antisubmarine exercises which included a cruise to Quebec in July. From 2 September to 12 November she served with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, and joined a midshipman cruise to northern Europe, visiting Gotesburg and Cherbourg, France, from 1 June to 27 July 1951. Her next tour of duty with the 6th Fleet was from 22 April to 23 October 1952. Corry sailed out of Norfolk for local operations until 1 April 1953 when she was decommissioned for conversion to a radar picket destroyer. She was reclassified DDR-817, 9 April 1953.

Recommissioned 9 January 1954, Corry carried NROTC midshipmen on a cruise to New Orleans, Louisiana, and through the Panama Canal for operations at Balboa in the summer of 1954. From September 1954 through 1960 Corry alternated four tours of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean with operations out of Norfolk along the east coast, and exercises in the Caribbean.

Corry reverted to DD-817 on 1 January 1964.

Corry performed a Western Pacific cruise from September 1968 to April 1969 in support of US forces in Vietnam. The ship sailed 49,125 nautical miles (90,980 km 56,532 mi) round trip out of Norfolk, Virginia. While supporting US forces during the Vietnam War, the ship fired 6,607 5"38 cal rounds, destroyed 72 structures and bunkers with 15 known enemy kills.

Corry was decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 27 February 1981.

The ship was transferred to Greece on 8 July 1981, and served in the Hellenic Navy as HS Kriezis (D-217). She was stricken in 1994. On 8 April 2002 the ship was removed from Souda Bay, Crete to be towed to Turkey for scrapping.


Corry DD- 817 - History


I have read the histories of the Waller and have a couple of corrections and stories to add. I joined the ship in Norfolk right out of Boot Camp and Radar "A" School in Great Lakes in June of 1968.

We left on the Vietnam cruse on September 22, 1968 and returned on April 18, 1969. We were in DesDev 362, consisting of the USS Robert L. Wilson DD 847, The USS Corry DD 817 and The Douglas H. Fox DD 779. About a day outside of Norfolk the Fox had a flashback in it's boiler and several crewmen were killed and/or injured, the Wilson took the injured to Charleston and the Sorry escorted the Fox into Charleston and we, on the Waller were told to continue on to San Diego. We reunited with the Wilson and the Sorry there.

While on station at Phan Thiet, the Captain had us anchor (not in any reports I am sure) but it sure made us accurate! I remember one night right before getting off watch (around 2000) the ship getting a call for NGFS for 60 rounds of 5 inch shell. At the time the ship had been swung by the tide in such a way only the aft gun could be shot. All sixty round came from that mount and since my compartment was under that mount, I went to sleep (when you are port and starboard you sleep whenever you can) while all the ceiling lights broke and fell while the 60 rounds where fired until the compartment was completely dark (except for the red lights). The next day the EM's replaced all the lights, but not for the last time.

After we got back to Subic Bay the barrels of both mounts were changed. There was a lot of trouble getting the front barrel out. The tender (an older one with a full crane) dropped a cable down into the barrel and tried to pull it out (after a day or so using a hammer device to turn the barrel). They tried sever times with the Tender leaning over and the Waller being pulled out of the water. I was in Combat and felt the ship rise and then fall. After picking the ship up, the cable broke and the ship dropped into the water pretty hard. I remember the tender crew standing along the rails while their ship rocked back and forth probably more than when at sea. (I think they finally had to cut the barrel out with torches) When it when to the bottom in June of 70 (bummer) the guns had only been fired about ten times with the new barrels.

Also while plane guarding with the USS Ranger we had the unfortunate occasion to have to pick up a downed pilot who crashed. His body was kept in the cooler until we reached Subic Bay. It was a night take off, during the day the helicopters could get to any down pilots well before us and save them.

After returning to Norfolk on April 18, 1969, the ship underwent an extensive inspection. There were rumors of going to Bayonne, NJ as a training ship (I was supposed to stay aboard), or being sold to the Italian Navy. Alas Waller was well past it prime and was just decommissioned. (it was never a training ship.) I was there for the decommissioning and after leave I was transferred to the USS Hawkins DD 873.

I am not sure what of any of this you will want to use but I can assure you it is all true as I was there. I was a RD3 in the Operations Department, OI Division and worked in the Combat Information Center (CIC).


USS Corry (DD-817), Gearing-Class Destroyer, Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida

USS Corry (DD/DDR-817) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, the third Navy ship named for Lieutenant Commander William M. Corry, Jr. (1889–1920), a naval aviator who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Corry was launched on 28 July 1945 by Consolidated Steel Corp. of Texas, Orange, Texas sponsored by Miss Corry commissioned on 27 February 1946, Commander M. S. Shellabarger in command and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

Corry sailed from Galveston, Texas, on 28 March 1946 for shakedown training in the Caribbean Sea, and arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, on 10 July. Following a tour of duty in European waters and the Mediterranean Sea from 23 July 1946 to 19 March 1947, Corry conducted Reserve training cruises from the Potomac River Naval Command, then reported to Pensacola, Florida, to serve as plane guard for aircraft carriers operating off Florida from 22 September 1947 to 28 April 1950.

Corry joined Destroyer Squadron 8 (DesRon 8) at Norfolk 22 May 1950 for antisubmarine exercises which included a cruise to Quebec in July. From 2 September to 12 November she served with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, and joined a midshipman cruise to northern Europe, visiting Gotesburg and Cherbourg, France, from 1 June to 27 July 1951. Her next tour of duty with the 6th Fleet was from 22 April to 23 October 1952. Corry sailed out of Norfolk for local operations until 1 April 1953 when she was decommissioned for conversion to a radar picket destroyer. She was reclassified DDR-817, 9 April 1953.

Recommissioned 9 January 1954, Corry carried NROTC midshipmen on a cruise to New Orleans, Louisiana, and through the Panama Canal for operations at Balboa in the summer of 1954. From September 1954 through 1960 Corry alternated four tours of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean with operations out of Norfolk along the east coast, and exercises in the Caribbean.

Corry reverted to DD-817 on 1 January 1964.

Corry performed a Western Pacific cruise from September 1968 to April 1969 in support of US forces in Vietnam. The ship sailed 49,125 nautical miles (90,980 km 56,532 mi) round trip out of Norfolk, Virginia. While supporting US forces during the Vietnam War, the ship fired 6,607 5"38 cal rounds, destroyed 72 structures and bunkers with 15 known enemy kills.

Corry was decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 27 February 1981.

For other ships with the same name, see Greek ship Kriezis.

The ship was transferred to Greece on 8 July 1981, and served in the Hellenic Navy as Kriezis (D217). She was stricken in 1994. On 8 April 2002 the ship was removed from Souda Bay, Crete to be towed to Turkey for scrapping.


Contents

Corry sailed from Galveston, Texas, on 28 March 1946 for shakedown training in the Caribbean, and arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, on 10 July. Following a tour of duty in European and Mediterranean waters from 23 July 1946 to 19 March 1947, Corry conducted Reserve training cruises from the Potomac River Naval Command, then reported to Pensacola, Florida, to serve as plane guard for aircraft carriers operating off Florida from 22 September 1947 to 28 April 1950.

Corry joined Destroyer Squadron 8 (DesRon 8) at Norfolk 22 May 1950 for antisubmarine exercises which included a cruise to Quebec in July. From 2 September to 12 November she served with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, and joined a midshipman cruise to northern Europe, visiting Gotesburg and Cherbourg, France, from 1 June to 27 July 1951. Her next tour of duty with the 6th Fleet was from 22 April to 23 October 1952. Corry sailed out of Norfolk for local operations until 1 April 1953 when she was decommissioned for conversion to a radar picket destroyer. She was reclassified DDR-817, 9 April 1953.

Recommissioned 9 January 1954, Corry carried NROTC midshipmen on a cruise to New Orleans, Louisiana, and through the Panama Canal for operations at Balboa in the summer of 1954. From September 1954 through 1960 Corry alternated four tours of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean with operations out of Norfolk along the east coast, and exercises in the Caribbean.

Corry reverted to DD-817 on 1 January 1964.

Corry was decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 27 February 1981.


Corry DD- 817 - History

VIETNAM WAR ZIPPOS

The Zippos depicted on this page illustrate the variety of "themes" that exist within the world of Vietnam Zippos. Vietnam War Zippos represent a varied and popular category for collectors for military memorabilia collectors as well as for Zippo fans. There are Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard Vietnam Zippos, as well as Zippos for the RVN, Australian and other services. A subset of Vietnam War Navy Zippos are Riverine or so-called Brown-Water Navy Zippos. There are different types of Vietnam engravings which are not necessarily mutually exclusive: (1) Zippo factory engraved (2) engraved "in-field" during the War (3) engraved by Veterans after the the war as personal souvenirs, and (4) engraved in more recent times to be sold as "in-field" Vietnam Zippos to unsuspecting collectors. There are also fakes, meaning lighters that closely resemble genuine Zippos that collectors should watch out for.

This 1966 Zippo says "Vietnam 66-67 Da Nang US Marine Corps " and barely visible in the naval crest lightly engraved reads "Smokey '66". The back side reads "Yea Though I Walk Through The Valley of the Shadow of Death I will fear no Evil For I am the Evilest Son of a Bitch in the Valley" Also lightly engraved on the back is the name "Danny".

1965 Zippo engraved in-field, with a map of Vietnam on one side and "LE Dunbar, 2116168, USMC, Chu Lai, Danang, Viet-Nam" on the other.

1st Marine Division USMC logo on front, map of Vietnam on the reverse, a factory engraved 1966 Zippo

1967 Zippo. One side is engraved "To Pop, Merry Christmas, from John, '67". The other side apparently engraved in-field "Freedom for those who fought, it has a special flavor the protected will never know".

1967 Zippo for "Troop E, 17th Cavalry Viet Nam" with attached badge for the Black Knights VMFA-314 . The back reads "Vietnam 67-68 Hue Killing for Peace Was Like Fucking For Virginity". While a genuine Zippo, the attachment and engravings are likely to have been done after the war.

In-field engraved 1968 Zippo belonging to Jack Treanton, USMC, who apparently served1967-69 in Khe Sanh, Dung Ha, Phu Bai, Quang Tri, An Hoa, Chu Lai and Da Nang

1962 Zippo engravedwith "S-CES Feb 66" on the lid and "124th Med Det (DS)" with a cadeus logo on the case. It was an optometry medical detachment

T1969 Zippo with a logo "Det 11 Portcall 619 TCS" referring to the 619th Tactical Control Squadron Detachment 11 based at Tan Son Nhut AB


Watch the video: This Is The US New Gigantic Aircraft Carrier Shocked The World (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Fenrishura

    Why did you raise the panic here?

  2. Maujinn

    I think, what is it - a lie.

  3. Nykko

    So simply does not happen

  4. Keiji

    Merry Christmas, congratulations

  5. Marceau

    It seems very good to me

  6. Boethius

    Great post - no words. Thanks.



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